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I installed sigma's old GeForce card in my Linux box (replacing the TNT2), and it works very nicely. I had to upgrade the NVidia driver to the latest one (the previous one crashed with it and Linux 2.6). I haven't noticed any performance improvements (I don't play first-person shooters on the machine, or do anything more demanding of video processing than watching DVDs/DivX files, which the TNT2 could do reasonably), but I've noticed that the picture is much cleaner; dark regions on the screen no longer leave dark smudges over light regions to their right (as the TNT2 did when pushed beyond 1024x768). It's good to have a video card whose analogue electronics were actually designed to work at 1280x1024.

Ta muchly, bfd.
Current Music:
Blueboy - Clearer
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On January 9th, 2005 03:55 pm (UTC), sigma commented:
I'm just happy to see it put to good use. I hate taking working electronics to the local recycling place, and would rather ship it overseas for to give it a good home. Congrats!

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On January 9th, 2005 05:09 pm (UTC), kineticfactory replied:
I'm much the same way. It was almost painful throwing out all the old ISA cards I had lying around, which had worked properly the last time I used them.

At least the TNT2 is fairly small, and thus contains less toxins to leach into the groundwater. Though I may hold onto it in case I ever need a video card for something that has an AGP slot and doesn't need to do high resolution graphics.
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On January 9th, 2005 05:43 pm (UTC), reddragdiva replied:
The entertaining thing to do with spare video cards is to put 'em in the machine anyway and tell X to do Xinerama. (I believe WinXP happily deals with multiple monitors as well.) You can have a goddamn VIDEO WALL, and only the main gaming screen needs the serious card with more memory and computing power than the PC it lives on.
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On January 9th, 2005 06:33 pm (UTC), kineticfactory replied:
Ah, but that requires having a motherboard with more than one AGP slot, doesn't it? I've only got the one and a bunch of PCI slots. I imagine there's no way of shoehorning an AGP card into a PCI slot (and having it do anything useful, anyway).

Besides which, I'm not yet making enough money to rent a place in London big enough to hold a desk with a decadent number of monitors on it.
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On January 9th, 2005 06:53 pm (UTC), reddragdiva replied:
Yeah, I was thinking of old PCI cards. arkady also used her XP laptop with a monitor plugged into it as a second screen. The XP control panel lets you do what a Mac II could do with video in ... 1988!

I still don't have my FreeBSD PC set up at home, precisely because there's literally nowhere to set up the screen!
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On January 9th, 2005 08:55 pm (UTC), kineticfactory replied:
You could always get a KVM switch box. Back in my one-monitor, pre-PowerBook days, I had one of those with my Linux box and my G3 Mac connected to the video parts of it. I used those cheap mechanical video switch boxes which would last a year or two before the switch started wearing out and your display started going toilet-cleaner blue; I think I went through two of them.
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