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Gedankenexperiment

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My MP3 player just threw a track from Popshopping, the collection of 1960s/70s West German commercial lounge-jazz, at me. For some reason, funky syncopated grooves with vocals in German sound amusingly incongruous; the sound of the German language, with its sibilant consonants and angular syllables, is an odd fit for such music. Though, on reflection, there is no reason why German should work any worse than English, or, say, Spanish or Welsh or what have you, with funky music.

Which made me wonder: how would music of African-American origin (being soul, gospel, blues, funk and indeed most pop music from Chuck Berry onwards) differ if the fledgling United States of America had adopted German, rather than English, as its national language (which folklore says almost happened; the folklore is incorrect, but this is a hypothetical exercise)? Would, to German-speaking parallel-universe Americans, it sound subjectively identical to the way English-language pop sounds to us? And, in that case, in what language would scary industrial metal be?
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Current Music:
Christian Bruhn - Strahler 70
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On November 17th, 2005 12:06 am (UTC), scopo commented:
ABC RN has been playing tracks from some 50s/early 60s German lounge album lately, called something like 'Cold War Cool' or somesuch. If only I could remeber what it's called, I'd be tempted to buy it!
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On November 17th, 2005 11:31 am (UTC), kineticfactory replied:
That sounds good.

I have a few albums of such things: the PopShopping series, The Schoolgirl Report (music from a series of German soft-porn films made between 1968 and 1972; it combines swinging bachelor pad music, psychedelic rock and a bit of cheesy oom-pah-pah) and "I Told You Not To Cry" (music from German detective TV shows and such). Not to mention Vampyros Lesbos, which is something similar only from Spanish exploitation films of the same era.
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